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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. c-span: i counted 27 different fbi files the you've gotten into in the back that you list. what value have they been to this book and how would they be different, how would the book be different? >> guest: i think they are good primary material part and the invasive wiretaps ra biographical material, and there are many files there but these are the ones in which the basic primary material and fbi material gathered at the ground level tends to be i think very reliable on the people that have been wiretapped like clarence jones who show in these conversations. when it get massaged through the headquarters and put to political use the materials to get distorted but there is nothing better than a verbatim wiretap transfer of somebody's telephone life. that's very revealing and often were showing quite the opposite character of the wiretaps are premised on in the and in fact what you will get is somebody talking about going to jail in the freedom movement and quite the noble character. c-span: how hard is it to get them? >> guest: not hard to get they are in the fbi reading room not
surprise was that j. edgar hoover and his fbi's campaign to destroy king politically, at least, was far more vicious, was far more relentless, and cruel, and i could imagine that public officials in the united states would do. how did i come to that conclusion? after a two or three year battle with the fbi and with my friends in the lbj library, part of the national archives, i was finally able to put together a mosaic of hundreds of fbi memos that went to the president. i saw how the president reacted to them, and didn't react to them. and even though great reporters have covered this story well, starting in '75 with the church hearings, i was appalled about that, and i don't want to be total alarmist, but when i see what the fbi has been empowered to do again, in investigating citizens, i have great pause. >> time for a few more questions. [inaudible] >> i changed my mind on really the central idea of the book. when i started out, a lot of very well-meaning dedicated white house aides and johnson cabinet officials told me that the president despised martin luther king, and why was i d
reasons. he wanted to destroy pat gray who was the interim fbi director after hoover. it had nothing to do with principle, had nothing to do with protecting the fbi from nixon. nixon was his ticket to becoming director, so he leaked in order to destroy gray and make nixon think well of felt and make felt the director. so the idea that he was a whistleblower or leaked to destroy richard nixon is completely untrue. >> so felt was a company guy? >> i'm sorry? >> felt was a company guy? >> the bureau was everything to him. it was his life, and being the directer of the bureau was a once in a lifetime opportunity, and he did everything in his power, engaging in dirty tricks, you know? fbi co-intel tactics to get to the directorship. and he flummoxed woodward. i don't think word woord really understood what was going on. >> do you feel he was misrepresented by woodward and bernstein? >> absolutely. i don't want fault woodward and bernstein's reporting in the fall of '72. what i fault is their book about the reporting. it's a fairy tale. >> we're following the death of -- [inaudible] bob woodward
the fbi that jack knew perfectly well that was the impression he would wear a trenchcoat because it afforded them protection in the field. he was given access to the medical records and he showed most events were wounded in the backcourt on the soles of their feet and it was an important break in this story to disprove what the troopers had been saying that the students opened fire and threw molotov cocktails. that is what i mean by pushing the envelope. >> years after that he would tell that story on himself. >> sounds like a saint to be. [laughter] later it became -- became considered inappropriate you was reluctant to acknowledgement now he has done it again with "scoop." ambassador young, that massacre is one example of jack bringing investigative reporting to the civil rights story also the fbi involvement killing, the meridian bombing, the attempted set up by the fbi that led to the rest of the klansman, murder in athens. tell me the impact of having that type of news coverage on the movement had on the national understanding of what was going on. >> we really understood th
, and it to look at the medical records of the students. and the administrator that he meant the fbi, which set new perfectly well that was the impression he was giving. he used to wear that pressed their cut in the trench coat that reporters just like fbi man because it afforded them a certain amount of protection sometimes in the field. anyway, he was given access to those medical records, and he showed that most of the students were wounded running away in the back. there were shot in the back or missiles of the feet. it was important break in a story to disprove what the troopers had been saying, that they had to find that the students had opened fire on them and have thrown molotov cocktails. so that is what i mean by pushing the envelope a little bit. >> he to five years after that he would tell that story on himself. >> that sounds like a saint to me. [laughter] >> i think later it would have been considered inappropriate to do such things when we writing her book. he was reluctant to go back and knowledge of hit and that. now he has done it again, and glad to see that. ambassador young, the
now in the government. and you say, well, i don't mind the police or the fbi. well, the department of agriculture has a s.w.a.t. team. the fish and wildlife have a s.w.a.t. team. in fact, the fish and wildlife raided gibson guitar with guns drawn, took all their computer equipment and their wood and then didn't let 'em know what they were accused of for a year. but then when they final aaccused them of something, it was breaking a foreign regulation. a law in india they were accused of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking in india. those are the kind of stories we write about. >> host: how come you haven't heard about that before? >> guest: some of them you have heard. one of them's the case of john and judy selling bunnies in a little town in missouri. they were fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, you can pay on our web site $90,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days you'll owe us $3.1 million. this is the kind of stuff that your government's doing to bully people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they're doing the same with confisc
on at the federal and state level. so in alaska last year the fbi gave covenant house its community partner award for the work that we're doing to identify victims of sex trafficking and to work on the prosecution of those who traffic kids. in pennsylvania several weeks ago, um, covenant house in philadelphia led a coalition that successfully championed new safe harbor legislation that helps victims of sex trafficking. and that would be true throughout the united states, and, of course, in latin america where covenant house works in mexico, nicaragua, guatemala and in honduras, we work very directly including we co-prosecute some of those cases against the gangs and cartels who are trafficking kids who are as young as 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 years old. the work that we do to help victims recover depends on where that victim is in terms of their exploitation, their suffering. but it almost always involves, um, psychiatric counseling, helping young people begin to deal with rape and exploitation and then help them build a plan forward that's not very different that the work that we were doig, you know, 30 y
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)